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Front Line Staff / Opinion / Staff Leadership and Management / Uncategorized

Three Shining Lights Against a Dark Cloud

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Under normal circumstances, I’m not one to be political in a public and professional forum, but really, I’m in need of some writing therapy.

Every day, I read the latest news story about another negative appointment to the President- elect’s cabinet. Who knew there were so many people who both seem to despise the role of government AND also want to lead it? While alarming, those aren’t even the most upsetting parts of my daily doldrums. What really brings me down are the escalating stories about racist attacks on a whole array of people who are part of the fabric and heart of this country. Apparently freed by Donald Trump’s purposefully divisive and unimaginably offensive comments, far too many people are letting lose what they really think.

To battle my dark cloud, I have three shining lights that brighten my day:

1) California.
2) Expanded learning programs and staff who make a difference in the lives of young people.
3) The amazing young people who will be that difference.

The day after the election, the Partnership for Children & Youth co-hosted a public seminar on social-emotional learning in Sacramento. Driving up from Oakland that morning, I couldn’t think past the previous night’s unbelievable disappointment. I also assumed there would be zero attendance at the seminar.

Much to my surprise, the room was packed with energetic people, eager to be positive, forward-thinking and impactful.

Love California! (If you haven’t already, please read this inspiring statement from the California Legislature.) The conversation about social-emotional learning was certainly timely – what stronger call to action than the election of a person who lacks the most basic skills around self-management, social awareness, growth mindset, etc.

As you can imagine, the conversation was rich. It focused on the educational imperative to go beyond testing and academics, and to intentionally and effectively support students in building the skills they will need to be responsible, inclusive and active citizens. These citizens – with stronger critical thinking skills and experience as leaders – can work together to build and maintain a positive community for everyone.

SEL circle

Expanded learning was a primary player in this conversation.

With deep roots in youth development, expanded learning programs help young people understand their potential and reach for it. Staff, like you, are deeply committed to creating safe spaces, giving kids the opportunity to learn and practice skills, encouraging their ideas and actions, and teaching them about their impact on each other and the world. The essence of youth worker skill is captured in the CDE’s quality standards that clearly define what we’re doing to make young people feel “I am, I belong, I can” – the essence of SEL skills as defined by your peers in “Student Success Comes Full Circle.” Thank you, ELO staff. You are nurturing the next and better generation.

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My 16-year-old daughter cried the night Trump won. But, she woke up in the morning with a smile and the realization that she’ll be 18 and eligible to vote in the mid-term election. And then there’s my favorite map from the election – showing the beautiful blue voting patterns of 18 to 25-year-olds. Watch out, Trump! There are a lot of smart, extremely motivated young women and men eager to mess with your agenda. Amazing young people who will be the difference!

 For breakfast, I’ve been adding extra sugar in my coffee, hoping to get rid of the bitter taste in my mouth. 

Author Profile: @katiebrackenridge

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